Study Guide

Big Bad Wolf

About this guide

The activities in this guide link the themes and concepts from Big Bad Wolf with The Australian Curriculum achievement standards and content descriptions within each learning area. Windmill hopes that this document will help you to make the most of Big Bad Wolf as a vehicle for genuine learning and reflection by providing a suite of learning tools that will help you to bring the show into the classroom across different curriculum areas both before and after viewing the performance. Windmill firmly believes that as experienced educators you know your students needs best, and so we invite you to adapt these activities to suit your own needs in the classroom as you see fit. The general capabilities are embedded within specific learning activities in this document and can be identified with the following icons.

The general capabilities are embedded within specific learning activities and can be identified with the following icons:

Synopsis

The opening setting is a forest. We meet Wolfy who, while having the physical characteristic of a Big Bad Wolf, is cut from a different cloth. He is actually quite nice, and therefore a bit of a joke amongst his wolf community. He prefers to eat vegetables instead of human beings. In fact, Wolfy likes people so much he came last in all his people scaring exams. More than anything he would like a friend. The second character we meet is the Rabbit (a hand puppet) who has a liking for breath mints, but when offered one from Wolfy runs off, screaming. The scene turns to a small house, very neat, perfect and lovely in the village of Alarmsville, a village that prides itself on being the safest in the whole wide world. This is where Heidi Hood lives and she has the best alarms in town. As well as being extremely particular in the care of her home, Heidi is very competitive. In fact, Heidi has never participated in a competition she hasn’t won. But there is another side to Heidi, even though she loves her safe and cosy town she yearns for freedom. A fourth character we meet (though we never actually see him) is the Flea from Cincinnati. Baggy the flea becomes Wolfy’s friend number one and sets him on his quest for friend number two. When Wolfy’s love of poetry provides an opportunity for Heidi to win another trophy, an unlikely friendship is born.

Writer's statement Matthew Whittet

We all know what it’s like to be misunderstood. For people to look at you and think you are something that you are not. Sometimes your voice is a little different than everyone else because you grew up in a different city, or you walk a little differently than everyone else cause your feet are a different shape or you’re a lot taller than everyone else because you ate a lot of porridge in the school holidays when your mum told you to. These are the differences that we only really think about when someone else points them out. And when they say “Oh my gosh, the way you walk is so weird, the way you talk is dumb and you’re so tall that you’re scary” … well we all know what happens then. And it’s not easy. Wolfy, our hero in Big Bad Wolf faces this problem every day. He may look scary, but really, he’s just a pacifist poet who loves his teddy bear. He’s all alone without a friend in the world because of how he looks and sounds, and because of what everyone thinks he is: a big bad wolf. And it’s only when he does a good deed to the irrepressible Heidi Hood (distant relative of Little Red Riding Hood) that someone thinks twice and starts to see him for who he really is.

For me, one of the great joys in life is words. The notion that you can think an idea, get a pen and write it down on a piece a paper, someone else picks it up and wham! They can see your idea in front of them. That there are words and sounds that can create such wonder and joy. That they can paint a picture, and make you a little scared and fill you with wonder and create new worlds from nothing. But also, sometimes that they are just plain fun. That a simple rhyme can make you laugh! How great is that!

Beside the idea of celebrating difference in people, the other thing that is of great importance in Big Bad Wolf is the idea that words can create this kind of joy. That they can build bridges and be used to help people understand you better, but also that they can just be a hoot.

Director's statement Rosemary Myers

One of the original functions of the wolf in classic fairy tales is to create a frightening character to keep children out of the forest. Our Executive Producer, Kaye Weeks, had the idea to turn the story on its head and tell an alternative version of events. Our creative team really responded to the idea of the wolf as a misunderstood outsider. Writer Matthew Whittet created the poetry writing vegematarian Wolfy and a story that shows if we are too quick to make presumptions about people, we may be missing out on having some truly excellent friends. Patrick Graham, who always lights up the Windmill stage, embodies Wolfy with such a wonderful nuance he has become one of Windmill’s favourite characters. Meeting him with equal panache, as the high achieving Heidi Hood, is Emma Hawkins. Emma is a hugely accomplished actor and, as a short statured person, her physicality provides a strong, often comic, juxtaposition with Patrick and an extra twist on the central idea of difference. Their onstage relationship is a highlight of this work and the idea of fearing what you don’t know, I think, makes our Big Bad Wolf a thematically pertinent story for our times.

From the moment the artists came together to work on this production we had a playful time creating a new fairytale world; one that is joyful, funny and full of quirky characters. For me, friends are one of the best things about being alive and it’s great to remember that new ones can be found in the most unexpected places.

Cast and Creatives

Matthew Whittet

Writer

Matthew is an actor and writer who has worked extensively in theatre, film and television for the past 19 years. As an actor, Matt has performed for Belvoir many times, most recently in productions Cinderella, The Book Of Everything and Conversation Piece.

Rosemary Myers

Director

Under Rose’s leadership as Artistic Director, Windmill creates and presents work inspired by the vibrancy, sophistication and inventiveness of young people and the exhilarating challenges they pose to creating theatre of relevance in this modern time.

Joanthon Oxlade

Designer

Jonathon studied Illustration and Sculpture at The Queensland College of Art and has designed sets and costumes in Australia for Windmill Theatre Co, Queensland Theatre, LaBoite Theatre, Is This Yours?, Aphids, Circa, Arena Theatre Company and many more.

Harry Covill

Sound Designer

Harry is a student at the Victorian College of the Arts. Still in the early stages of his career, he has composed music for theatre, film, video art and community arts. His work has been shown in a range of venues and festivals nationally and internationally.

Chris Petridis

Lighting Designer

Chris completed his Technical Production course at the Adelaide Centre of the Arts. Since graduating, he has been working extensively and continuing to develop his experience across theatre, dance, and other live events both in Australia and overseas.

Carol Wellman Kelly

Movement

Carol was made in Australia and studied dance at the Victorian College of the Arts. She has extensive experience in performing, teaching and choreographing both nationally and internationally. From 1992 – 1999, she worked as a freelancer in London.

Patrick Graham

Performer

Patrick has previously worked on Windmill productions including The Wizard of Oz, Boom Bah! and Big Bad Wolf. For floogle, an independent company Patrick co-founded, he has performed in One Long Night in the Land of Nod, Black Crow Lullabies.

Emma J Hawkins

Performer

Emma has a flair for flamboyant, serious and whimsical productions. This plays to her strengths as a feisty, charismatic thespian with a knack for subversive, escapist comedy, high-octane dramatics and brilliantly versatile circus showcases.

Ellen Steele

Performer

Ellen graduated from Flinders Drama Centre in 2006 and has since worked extensively in theatre both within Australia and overseas. Credits include Between Two Waves, Holding the Man, Maestro (STCSA), Love, Ruby Bruise (Vitalstatistix), Wolf (Slingsby).

Characters

Wolfy

Everyone knows a wolf is something scary, but this wolf, while he still has sharp teeth and pointy ears is actually quite nice. Since he was a little wolf, all he has wanted was to have a friend.

Heidi Hood

Heidi is the second cousin twice removed on her uncle’s,
mother’s side of the sister-in-law of the great aunt of the first cousin who lived down the road from a lady who once met the postman who had delivered letters for a time to the great granddaughter of the most famous hood of them all, Little Red Riding Hood.

Narrator

Displaying great virtuosity, one actor takes on (and manipulates) the various roles and functions of
the people, creatures and objects that inhabit the world of Wolfy and Heidi including Narrator, TV reporter and Grand Master Wolf Voiceover for the rabbit, the flea
from Cincinnati, the couch and the tree.

TV Reporter

Grand Master Wolf

Rabbit

The Couch

The Tree

Performance literacy

Students viewing live theatre can experience feelings of joy, sadness, anger, wonder and empathy. It can engage their imaginations and invite them to make meaning of their world and their place within it. They can consider new possibilities as they immerse themselves in familiar and not so familiar stories.

Watching theatre also helps students understand the language of the theatre. It is part of the holistic approach to developing student literacy. They learn to ‘read’ the work interpreting the gesture and movement of a performer; deconstructing the designers’ deliberate manipulation of colour, symbol and sound; and reflecting on the director’s and playwright’s intended meaning.

While viewing the show, students’ responses can be immediate as they laugh, cry, question and applaud. After the performance, it is also extremely valuable to provide opportunities for discussion, encouraging students to analyse and comprehend how these responses were evoked by the creatives through the manipulation of production elements and expressive skills.

Having a strong knowledge and understanding of theatre terminology will assist students with this process. Therefore, before coming to see Big Bad Wolf with your students, explore the different roles involved in making a performance happen, from writing, directing and performing, to lighting, projection, set and costume design and construction.

Theatre Etiquette

Visiting the theatre is very exciting. There are some guidelines that students can follow regarding appropriate behaviour in the theatre and during the performance that will allow their visit to be even more memorable.  Prior to visiting the theatre prepare students for what they will experience as an audience member using the following questions:

Where can you sit?

  • An usher (front of house – FOH) will help you find your seat so you need to follow their directions.

How do you know when the performance begins?

  • The lights will dim and/or you might hear a voice-over or sound. That’s your cue that it has begun and it is time to settle and be quiet.

How is going to the theatre different to going to the movies or watching television in your loungeroom?

  • Something unique to theatre is that it is ‘live’ and the actors are real. You can hear and see the actors, and they can hear and see you.

What is the relationship between the audience and the performers?

  • As the actors can see and hear you, your responses to the performance show your appreciation to the actors. So, show your enjoyment!

Final points to remember:

  • turn off your mobile phone (even the vibration of a phone or lit screen is distracting);
  • avoid eating in the theatre and rustling paper;
  • cover coughs and sneezes;
  • don’t film or photograph the performance due to intellectual ownership.

Curriculum links and activities

Drama F-2

Pre-Show Activities

Australian Curriculum F-2

Activity
Introductions and applause. Have students take it in turns to stand up and tell the group their name and their favourite story. After each child has had a turn, everyone in the group gives them a huge round
of applause. This builds confidence and can lead to discussions about how to be a good, supportive audience member. If the students are confident enough, you can progress the game to include an action
with their introduction, or a sentence about what they like to do.
Hot seating. After discussing and reading a range of different fairy tales (see Literacy activities), ask students to become one of their favourite characters and sit on a chair facing the class. Other students take it in
turns to ask them questions, which the child must answer in character. You can model this by going first, and you can also vary the audience size if your students need to build up confidence first.
LEARNING OUTCOMES

Explore role and dramatic action in dramatic play, improvisation
and process drama (ACADRM027)

Use voice, facial expression, movement and space to imagine
and establish role and situation (ACADRM02)

Australian Curriculum 3 – 4

Activity

Hot seating. After discussing and reading a range of different fairy tales (see Literacy activities), ask students to become one of their favourite
characters and sit on a chair facing the class. Other students take it in turns to ask them questions, which the child must answer in character. You can model this by going first, and you can also vary the audience
size if your students need to build up confidence first.

LEARNING OUTCOMES
  • Explore ideas and narrative structures through roles and situations
    and use empathy in their own improvisations and devised drama
    (ACADRM031)
  • Use voice, body, movement and language to sustain role and relationships and create dramatic action with a sense of time and place (ACADRM032)


Post-show Activities

Australian Curriculum F-2

Activity

Play review. Ask your students to become theatre critics and review Big Bad Wolf. Depending on age and ability, ask them to write words, sentences or draw pictures under the following headings. You can also find numerous templates online.

  • Title
  • Plot (what was the story about? What was your favourite part?)
  • Characters (who were the characters? Who was your favourite?)
  • Opinion (did you like the show? Why/why not?)
  • Picture (draw a picture of your favourite part of the show)

Put your students into small, mixed ability groups. Ask them to create a short performance; a twisted fairy tale. They should take a well known story, but change something integral to the plot (e.g. Little Red Riding Hood is actually a wolf herself; Snow White is actually set on an asteroid etc.) Allow them at least 4 blocks of rehearsal time, of roughly 30 minutes each. Ask them to focus on rehearsing their play the same way each time, so that each person knows what to say and when. Make the focus on group work, building the skills they have in working as a team. Allow your students to perform their plays to a small audience. This could be just their own class. After each play, ask the audience to give them two stars and a wish, two things they liked about the performance, and one thing they wish could improve if they had more rehearsal time. Don’t worry if the plot is a bit strange, or if they forget their lines; at this age, the experience of performing for an audience and getting constructive feedback at the end is extremely worthwhile.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Respond to drama and consider where and why people make drama,
starting with Australian drama including drama of Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander Peoples (ACADRR030)

Explore role and dramatic action in dramatic play, improvisation and
process drama (ACADRM027)

Use voice, facial expression, movement and space to imagine and
establish role and situation (ACADRM028)

Present drama that communicates ideas, including stories from their
community, to an audience (ACADRM029)

Australian Curriculum 3 – 4

Activity

Play review. Ask your students to become theatre critics and review Big Bad Wolf. Depending on ability, ask them to write short phrases or full sentences, adding pictures to illustrate, under the following headings. You can also find numerous templates online.

  • Title
  • Plot (what was the story about? What was your favourite part?)
  • Characters (who were the characters? Who was your favourite?)
  • Opinion (did you like the show? Why/why not?)
  • Purpose (what do you think the purpose of this play was? Why write it and put it on for audiences?)

Put your students into small, mixed ability groups. Ask them to create a short performance: a ‘twisted’ fairy-tale. They should take a well-known story, but change something integral to the plot (e.g. Little Red Riding Hood is actually a wolf herself; Snow White is actually set on an asteroid etc.) Allow them at least 4 blocks of rehearsal time, of roughly 30 minutes each. Ask them to focus on rehearsing their play the same way each time, so that each person knows what to say and when. Make the focus on group work, building the skills they have in working as a team.

You could choose to perform to a live audience, or film their performances and create short movies (iMovie on an iPad is extremely child-friendly).

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Identify intended purposes and meaning of drama, starting with
Australian drama, including drama of Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander Peoples, using the elements of drama to make comparisons
(ACADRR034)

Explore ideas and narrative structures through roles and situations and use empathy in their own improvisations and devised drama (ACADRM031)

Use voice, body, movement and language to sustain role and relationships and create dramatic action with a sense of time and place (ACADRM032)

Collect, access and present different types of data using simple software to create information and solve problems (ACTDIP009)



English F-2

Pre-show Activities

Australian Curriculum F-2

Activity

Fairy tales. Discuss traditional stories and a stories the students already know. Are there any common features that they all share? Discuss the use of a quest or problem in a story and explain the beginning, middle and end elements.

Create a story mountain for a story you have read together (The Three Little Pigs, Red Riding Hood etc.) Discuss the characters in fairy tales. Are there always good and evil characters? Which characters are your students’ favourites? Get them to create a poster of their favourite character; draw a picture of them and list the reasons why that character is their favourite.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Foundation Year
Respond to texts, identifying favourite stories, authors and
illustrators (ACELT1577)

Identify some features of texts including events and characters and
retell events from a text (ACELT1578)

Recognise some different types of literary texts and identify some
characteristic features of literary texts, for example beginnings and
endings of traditional texts and rhyme in poetry (ACELT1785)

Year 1

Discuss characters and events in a range of literary texts and share
personal responses to these texts, making connections with students’
own experiences (ACELT1582)

Discuss features of plot, character and setting in different types
of literature and explore some features of characters in different
texts (ACELT1584)

Year 2

Compare opinions about characters, events and settings in and
between texts (ACELT1589)

Identify aspects of different types of literary texts that entertain,
and give reasons for personal preferences (ACELT1590)

Discuss the characters and settings of different texts and
explore how language is used to present these features in different
ways (ACELT1591)

Australian Curriculum 3 – 4

Activity

Discuss fairy tales with your students. Which ones used to be their favourites? Have they ever read any different versions of a fairy-tale (e.g. Roald Dahl’s Little Red Riding Hood and the Wolf)? How can setting play an important part in a story? Explore how to create a descriptive, captivating setting to start a story.

Get your students to write their own fairytale, or twisted fairytale. They should focus on creating a setting using all five of their senses to appeal to their audience. You could ask them to write their stories for a younger year level, and focus on the language that will make their story appeal to that age range.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Year 3

Discuss how language is used to describe the settings in texts, and
explore how the settings shape the events and influence the mood of
the narrative (ACELT1599)

Understand that paragraphs are a key organisational feature of written texts (ACELA1479)

Year 4

Understand how texts vary in complexity and technicality depending
on the approach to the topic, the purpose and the intended
audience(ACELA1490)

Listen for specific purposes and information, including instructions, and extend students’ own and others’ ideas in discussions (ACELY1666)

Discuss how authors and illustrators make stories exciting, moving and absorbing and hold readers’ interest by using various techniques, for example character development and plot tension (ACELT1605)



Post-show Activities

Australian Curriculum F-2

Activity

Poetry. Discuss the love that Wolfy has for poetry. Discuss how Wolfy finds it easy to rhyme words, whereas Heidi Hood found it very tricky. Read a variety of books that use rhyme (e.g. books by authors such as Dr Seuss, Julia Donaldson, Lynley Dodd). Explore rhyming words with your class and create a chart of words that rhyme. Teach and rehearse a performance poem with your students (e.g. Revolting Rhymes by Roald Dahl or On the Ning Nang Nong). Perform to an audience when you are ready.

Using the theme of fairy tales, ask your students to create a short poem based on a story, or just one character from that story. They could work individually, or in pairs/small groups. You could choose to publish the poems in a class book, or use ICT skills to create a digital book or blog of your students’ work.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Foundation Year

Recognise some different types of literary texts and identify some
characteristic features of literary texts, for example beginnings and
endings of traditional texts and rhyme in poetry

Replicate the rhythms and sound patterns in stories, rhymes, songs and poems from a range of cultures (ACELT1579)

Retell familiar literary texts through performance, use of illustrations and images (ACELT1580)

Year 1

Listen to, recite and perform poems, chants, rhymes and songs,
imitating and inventing sound patterns including alliteration and
rhyme (ACELT1585)

Recreate texts imaginatively using drawing, writing, performance and digital forms of communication (ACELT1586)

Innovate on familiar texts by using similar characters, repetitive patterns or vocabulary (ACELT1832)

Year 2

Identify, reproduce and experiment with rhythmic, sound and word
patterns in poems, chants, rhymes and songs (ACELT1592)

Create events and characters using different media that develop key
events and characters from literary texts (ACELT1593)

Innovate on familiar texts by experimenting with character, setting or plot (ACELT1833)

Australian Curriculum 3 – 4

Activity

Poetry. Discuss the love that Wolfy has for poetry. Discuss how Wolfy finds it easy to rhyme words, whereas Heidi Hood found it very tricky. Read a variety of books that use rhyme (e.g. books by authors such as Dr Seuss, Julia Donaldson, Lynley Dodd). Explore rhyming words with your class and create a chart of words that rhyme. Teach and rehearse a performance poem with your students (e.g. Revolting Rhymes by Roald Dahl or On the Ning Nang Nong). Perform to an audience when you are ready.

Using the theme of fairy tales, ask your students to create a short poem based on a story, or just one character from that story. They could work individually, or in pairs/small groups. You could choose to publish the poems in a class book, or use ICT skills to create a digital book or blog of your students’ work.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Year 3

Create texts that adapt language features and patterns encountered
in literary texts, for example characterisation, rhyme, rhythm, mood,
music, sound effects and dialogue (ACELT1791)

Use software including word processing programs with growing speed and efficiency to construct and edit texts featuring visual, print and audio elements (ACELY1685)

Year 4

Understand, interpret and experiment with a range of devices and
deliberate word play in poetry and other literary texts, for example
nonsense words, spoonerisms, neologisms and puns (ACELT1606)

Use a range of software including word processing programs to
construct, edit and publish written text, and select, edit and place
visual, print and audio elements (ACELY1697)



Personal and Social Capability F-2

Pre-show Activities

Australian Curriculum F-2

Activity

What makes a good friend? Have a discussion about friends; what qualities do we look for in a friend? What can we do to be a good friend? What things should we avoid doing?

Sitting in a circle, hold a ball of string or yarn. Explain that together you will make a web of friendship with the string. Holding on tight to one end, roll the ball to one person in the circle and at the same time, tell them something that they do that makes them a good friend. That person should then hold the string tight, and roll the ball to someone else whilst telling them something that makes them a good friend. If everyone keeps hold of their piece of string, you should end up with a web-like creation, filled with verbal compliments about each other.

ACTIVITY NOTE

You could record or write down the compliments to create a visual display at a later date.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Typically, by the end of Foundation Year, students:

  • Explore relationships through play and group experiences
  • Identify positive ways to initiate, join and interrupt conversations with adults and peers
  • Listen to others’ ideas, and recognise that others may see things differently from them

Typically, by the end of Year 2, students:

  • Explore relationships through play and group experiences
  • Identify positive ways to initiate, join and interrupt conversations with adults and peers
  • Listen to others’ ideas, and recognise that others may see things differently from them.
Activity

Open up a discussion about fears and dislikes. What are some things the group is afraid of? Are there many common fears? What can you do to make yourself feel better when you’re afraid (cuddle a teddy bear, put the lights on etc.)

Create a list of real fears vs imagined fears. A real fear is the perception of physical or emotional danger. Imagined fear is an unjustified fear, such as a phobia or fear of monsters and ghosts. Create a list of coping strategies to help students when they experience either of these fears.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Typically, by the end of Foundation Year, students:

  • Identify a range of emotions and describe situations that may evoke these emotions
  • Identify their likes and dislikes, needs and wants, and explore what influences these.
  • Express their emotions constructively in interactions with others

Typically, by the end of Year 2, students:

  • Compare their emotional responses with those of their peers
  • Identify and describe personal interests, skills and achievements and explain how these contribute to family and school life
  • Reflect on what they have learnt about themselves from a range of experiences at home and school

Australian Curriculum 3 – 4

Activity

What makes a good friend? Have a discussion about friends; what qualities do we look for in a friend? What can we do to be a good friend? What things should we avoid doing? How can we act when we disagree with someone?

Sitting in a circle, hold a ball of string or yarn. Explain that we are going
to make a ‘web of friendship’ with the string. Holding on tight to one end, roll the ball to one person in the circle and at the same time, tell them something that they do that makes them a good friend, or something that they do that contributes positively to the class community. That person should then hold the string tight, and roll the ball to someone else whilst telling them something that makes them a good friend. If everyone keeps hold of their piece of string, you should end up with a web-like creation, filled with verbal compliments about each other.

ACTIVITY NOTE

You could record or write down the compliments to create a visual display at a later date.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Typically, by the end of Year 4, students

  • Discuss the value of diverse perspectives and describe a point of view that is different from their own
  • Describe factors that contribute to positive relationships, including with people at school and in their community
  • Describe characteristics of cooperative behavior and identify evidence of these in group activities


Post-show Activities

Australian Curriculum 3 – 4

Activity

Ask your students to write down a word or a phrase that defines the word ‘unique’. Share and discuss their answers. What made Wolfy unique? Is it always fun being unique?

Ask your students to plan and deliver a short presentation on what it means to be unique. They could use personal examples as well as famous people, or characters from stories. They could do this work individually, or in pairs. They could create a poster or computer presentation (PowerPoint, Prezi etc.) to accompany their talk.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Typically, by the end of Year 4, students

  • Discuss the value of diverse perspectives and describe a point of view that is different from their own
  • Describe factors that contribute to positive relationships, including with people at school and in their community
  • Describe characteristics of cooperative behaviour and identify evidence of these in group activities


Science F-2

Pre-show Activities

Australian Curriculum F-2

Activity

Discuss non-fiction books. What are their features, and how do they differ from fiction books?

Using books and online search engines, gather information about wolves. What do they eat? Where do they live? What do they look like, and what do their young look like? How are they different from domesticated dogs?

Create a class information book about wolves, adding to it as you go.

ACTIVITY NOTE

See post-performance note on what to add after seeing the show.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Foundation Year

Living things have basic needs, including food and water (ACSSU002)

Share observations and ideas (ACSIS012)

Year 1

Living things have a variety of external features (ACSSU017)

Living things live in different places where their needs are met (ACSSU211)

Represent and communicate observations and ideas in a variety of ways (ACSIS029)

Year 2

Living things grow, change and have offspring similar to themselves (ACSSU030)

Represent and communicate observations and ideas in a variety of ways (ACSIS042)

Australian Curriculum 3 – 4

Activity

Discuss non-fiction books. What are their features, and how do they
differ from fiction books?

Using books and online search engines, gather information about wolves. What do they eat? Where do they live? What do they look like, and what do their young look like? How are they different from domesticated dogs?

Explore the life cycle and food chains of wolves. Watch this video
about the re-introduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park in the US. Create a class information book about wolves, adding to it as you go.

ACTIVITY NOTE

See post-performance note on what to add after seeing the show.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Year 3

Living things can be grouped on the basis of observable features and
can be distinguished from non-living things (ACSSU044)

Represent and communicate observations, ideas and findings using
formal and informal representations (ACSIS060)

Year 4

Living things have life cycles (ACSSU072)

Living things depend on each other and the environment to survive (ACSSU073)

Represent and communicate observations, ideas and findings using formal and informal representations (ACSIS071)



Post-show Activities

Australian Curriculum F-2

Activity

Revisit non-fiction books and their features. Add a page for Wolfy to the class info book, describing his differences to a typical wolf. Students could draw their own versions of Wolfy to add to the book.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Foundation Year

Living things have basic needs, including food and water (ACSSU002)

Share observations and ideas (ACSIS012)

Year 1

Living things have a variety of external features (ACSSU017)

Living things live in different places where their needs are
met (ACSSU211)

Represent and communicate observations and ideas in a variety of ways (ACSIS029)

Year 2

Living things grow, change and have offspring similar to
themselves (ACSSU030)

Represent and communicate observations and ideas in a variety of ways (ACSIS042)

Australian Curriculum 3 – 4

Activity

Re-visit non-fiction books and their features. Add a page for Wolfy to the class info book, describing his differences to a ‘typical’ wolf. Students could draw their own versions of Wolfy to add to the book.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Year 3

Living things can be grouped on the basis of observable features and
can be distinguished from non-living things (ACSSU044)

Represent and communicate observations, ideas and findings using
formal and informal representations (ACSIS060)

Year 4

Living things have life cycles (ACSSU072)

Living things depend on each other and the environment to survive
(ACSSU073)

Represent and communicate observations, ideas and findings using
formal and informal representations (ACSIS071)



Health and Physical Education F-2

Post-Show Activities

Australian Curriculum F-2

Activity

Staying safe. Open a discussion about the things we do to keep ourselves safe in public. What rules do we need to follow? Talk about going on an excursion, and how we know which people we can trust if we get lost
(police, people in uniforms with name badges at a museum etc.)

Ask your students if they would like a lolly and offer them one from a bag. See how they react. Now ask them to imagine that you are a stranger, or even worse: a wolf! How would they react? Why do we have rules about strangers (stranger danger)? How do these help keep us safe?

Role play a few situations where one student plays a child in need of
help and a few other students play roles such as a policeman, a stranger, and a teacher. Encourage discussions about what the child should do in each situation.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Foundation Year

Identify people and demonstrate protective behaviours and other
actions that help keep themselves safe and healthy (ACPPS003)

Years 1 – 2

Practise strategies they can use when they feel uncomfortable, unsafe
or need help with a task, problem or situation (ACPPS017)



Design and Technologies F-2

Post-show Activities

Australian Curriculum 3 – 4

Activity

Puppet making. Discuss the use of puppets in Big Bad Wolf. Explain to your students that they will be putting on a short puppet show to a younger year level based on friendship. Ask your students to design and create their own puppets, thinking about how to make them appealing to younger children. They will also need to think about how they wish to manipulate the puppets. They should then write and perform their play, and then evaluate their puppets afterwards.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Critique needs or opportunities for designing and explore and test
a variety of materials, components, tools and equipment and the
techniques needed to produce designed solutions (ACTDEP014)

Generate, develop, and communicate design ideas and decisions using appropriate technical terms and graphical representation techniques
(ACTDEP015)

Select and use materials, components, tools, equipment and techniques and use safe work practices to make designed solutions (ACTDEP016)

Plan a sequence of production steps when making designed solutions



Acknowledgements

Produced by Windmill Theatre Co. Original study guide created by Drama Education Specialist Julie Orchard. Updated in 2017 by Drama Education Specialist Natalie McCarl.

The activities and resources contained in this document are designed for educators as the starting point for developing more comprehensive lessons for this work.

© Copyright protects this Education Resource. Except for purposes permitted by the Copyright Act, reproduction by whatever means is prohibited. However, limited photocopying for classroom use only is permitted by educational institutions.

This resource is proudly supported by the South Australian Department for Education and the Lang Foundation.

  •  Lang Foundation
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